Tag Archives: creative visualization

DO – A.C. Ping

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No, try not! Do or do not! There is no try. I just love that. Yoda is my guru. And A.C. Ping leads off a second packed volume of his self-help trilogy with Yoda’s line from The Empire Strikes Back. DO is the lime-green paperback, appearing between Ping’s other well-received books, BE and FAITH, and it is packed with pragmatic tips and observations culled from traditional and new age spiritual teachings. Ping wastes no time getting to the call to action. This is a serious guide for personal transformation and its mantra might be “no excuses.”

There are lots of good examples of the teachings in action, from the certainty required to manifest through creative visualization to an admonition to “Change your story” when it isn’t going well. Accompanying the advice are methods for doing so—not thinking about it or trying to do it but moving in the direction of your dream. Ping talks about the risk inherent in putting everything on the line, and the necessity for doing so. He gets pretty explicit about it, confessing incidents when he convinced himself to take the easy way out and then missed an important opportunity for growth.

“There is no road” said poet Antonio Machado. “We make the road by walking.” (Another favorite quote.) DO is the imperative, the active verb that machetes the underbrush and clears the way. There is nothing startling and brand new in Ping’s prescriptions. You can find advice about meditating to build inner strength and clarity, evaluating energy transactions between people to determine whether they are positive, writing intentions down to concretize them, daring to be honest and authentic even when it makes you uncomfortable, cultivating the patience to wait for exactly what you want and need and then going for it. The virtue of the book is that so many of the classic teachings about self-realization and creating your own life are contained in one place.

DO would be a great carry-along for a blast of inspiration when you’re stuck in a line or commuting to work. It’s a practical workbook with space to make your own notes as you adapt the ideas to your life and experience. In some ways, this is a compact primer of common sense but it’s full of universal principles, not homespun. Ping’s message is a digest of all the nuggets of wisdom in all those volumes of self-help you’ve read—or despaired of ever reading. Dip into it in the library or the bookstore and see if it speaks to you. Just do it.

Do   A.C. Ping | Marlowe & Company   2004