Category Archives: Film

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland – Catherynne M. Valente

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making is not your Hans Christian Andersen fairytale. Catherynne M. Valente has concocted a mash-up of pun, wit, traditional fairytale conceits, cautionary fable and pure, unadulterated insanity. This is a very Earnest Story about a Deadly Serious twelve-year-old who seems a little reflective for an American pre-teen and a lot naive for a kid that age. It’s somewhat Dorothy Does Oz After Abandoning Kansas and as full of epic challenges and unusual traveling companions as anything Judy Garland sang her way through.

September is disaffected with her life in World War II Nebraska as mom goes off to play Rosie the Riveter each day and dad has vanished into the European front somewhere. When she is whisked away to Fairyland she goes without a backward glance. Children that age have yet to grow a heart, we are informed, and September is mercifully unencumbered by one. Things begin to go haywire immediately. September receives any number of warnings about the laws in Fairyland and promptly forgets a few and misinterprets the rest. She does try to have an Adventure with No Strings Attached but she isn’t as cool and calculating as she imagines herself to be.

Fairyland seems to be under a deeply wicked spell and the magical creatures that cross paths with September all need something important from her–she gives it without much hesitation. The girl isn’t aware that she is beginning to grow a heart. Hearts are dangerous things and September’s will cost her dear. But she acquires a good soaking in courage and a jeweled sceptre that provides convenient rubies when she needs a bit of change and a faithful flying key and a warm green jacket, although she has lost a shoe. The shoe thing isn’t Cinderella all over again as there are no princes in this tale but there are dragonish creatures and pirates who trade in shadows and covet pookas and a wicked girl with sausage curls who has designs on the powers of September’s new-found heart.

It’s a really unique and fascinating book, although I found it tiring to read–there is so much cleverness crammed into every sentence that it takes effort to stay focused, line by line, so you don’t miss anything. After I finished it I discovered that the book started out as a chapter-by-chapter online serial story, which may account for my sense that I had just read a whole collection of fairytales and not one book. The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland is pretty good but a kid will have to be a VERY accomplished and dedicated reader to stick with it.  Terrific vocabulary and word plays. Not for the faint of heart. And not for cramming into a one-day read like a crazed marathon. But, oh well, all my reading is like that now. One month to go. Battling evil forces in Fairyland seems like child’s play compared to reading a book a day on pure adrenalin and not much sleep. But then, I’m living several hours a day inside books and  nothing about an imaginary world is exactly easy.  Dragons? Wicked spells? Dashed hopes and broken promises? Deadly storms and impenetrable gaols? Bring ‘em on.

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making   Catherynne M. Valente | Macmillan  2011

The String Bean – Edmond Séchan

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I first encountered The String Bean (Le Haricot) as a film and loved it. The mostly black and white French movie by Edmond Séchan, who also created the text for the book, has music but no dialog. It is the story of an old Parisian seamstress who lives alone, many floors up a winding staircase in a dark, shabby building. She is wizened and bent but her spirit is full of color and life.

Each day, after she makes glittering, pearl-encrusted evening bags for sale to elegant shops and has her sparse and simple meal, she puts on her hat and goes out to the public gardens. Wandering the Tuileries—scenes that are in color–the old woman dreams of the lush gardens of her childhood. On the way home, she makes a stop to window-gaze at a florist’s, full of gorgeous blooms she could never afford. One day, she finds an old clay pot with a dead plant that someone has tossed in the trash. She takes the pot home.

Once she has removed the dead plant with her only fork, she carefully pokes a bean into the soil and waters it. Then she sets the pot on her window ledge where it will get the few rays of sun to reach her apartment every day. She tries to protect the seedling from predatory pigeons and neighbors shaking out dusty rugs; she stakes the new leaves so the stem will grow tall. But the pigeons are too many and the sun is too weak for her plant to survive. She pulls a chair out to the hall, where a patch of brighter sun from a skylight will fall on the plant, and sets the pot on the seat.

It isn’t enough. The bean plant wilts and grows pale. So she decides to clandestinely transfer it to a boxwood border surrounding the Tuileries flower gardens. She will lose her daily companion but the bean plant will get plenty of sun and water to flower and grow. What happens next is both heartbreaking and hopeful. The photographs and straightforward text of the book are evocative and powerful, just as the film is.

The tale is an allegory for life and hope that is deceptively simple. As a book, The String Bean could certainly be handed to a kid but the emotions and the underlying concepts are very big—it might take some guidance or some maturity for the story to be appreciated. I’m happy to have experienced both the film and the book. You might have to search for a copy of either but the hunt would be worth it.    

The String Bean   Edmond Séchan | Doubleday  1982

Best Animated Short 2012 — about books!

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore WON the Oscar for Best Animated Short! One lovely scene dramatizes that books only come alive when you read them. The whole film seems like a metaphor for subsuming your life in books–so I am especially fond of it in the midst of all this relentless reading. Enjoy!