Why Not Say What Happened? — Ivana Lowell

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Ivana Lowell is a person cobbled together out of careless bits of the damaged, larger-than-life characters who were her legendary family. The biological ancestry is the star-crossed and very alcoholic Irish Guinness clan, titled and landed British aristocracy, and some confusion in the region of actual parentage. Her revolving cast of relatives and serial stepfathers included the poet Robert Lowell, whose name she was given, and the colorful companions of her extravagantly social, unconventional and decidedly undomestic mother. Why Not Say What Happened? is a memoir sprinkled with high-profile names – painters, writers, filmmakers, actors, royalty, politicians – lists from social registers and from tabloid headlines, and rosters of the incredibly rich.

Lowell lived on estates that were grand and never centrally heated. The children were often housed in another wing, neglected, abused and gathered into the manic warmth of parental attention and parties just often enough to be imprinted with all of it. The child Ivana is molested by a servant, scalded, scarred for life and nearly killed in a kitchen accident and alternately fussed over and abandoned. But second-best caviar is all she knows so, like any child, she adapts. The theater that is her life is a perpetually alluring road show she learns to navigate and emulate.

Why Not Say What Happened? is a very sad chronicle of terrible tragedies and near criminal culpability that reads like a juicy novel. The rich are different—normal life is a money-fueled, exalted procession of privileged experiences, invaluable connections, flights to this and that exotic place and flights from uncomfortable brushes with reality. But Lowell is so resilient, or so enabled, that she prevails through bout after bout of drunkenness and rehab, madcap moments and memorable parties, screen shots of cinematic clarity and lucid introspection. All the broken people in her world adore and despise each other, cling to and castigate each other, love each other in some original fashion that usually looks nothing like love.

The mystery of Lowell’s father, a question raised in the beginning of the book, doesn’t begin to haunt her until after her mother’s death. But the truth of it, and the lies, deceptions and utter narcissism that hides from her a true identity informs her whole life. Money and position kept Ivana Lowell far from a dirty and seamy death in the streets. Her talent for telling a good story on herself gives us a glimpse behind the moth-eaten velvet curtain that hides her particular stage from view. It is an interesting mess of a life that was doomed from the start but spun itself out in joys and sorrows anyway. She’s a likable character in this book. A character from another world at once fabulous, appalling, fascinating and just plain awful. But eccentricity makes for page-turners and spilling secrets lures readers on. Why Not Say What Happened? is high-level gossip, engagingly divulged.

The death of Caroline Guinness, Ivana Lowell’s mother, is where it falters. Caroline was a destructive force as impossible to overlook as a Category 5 hurricane. Once she leaves the stage, the lurid headlines vanish, too. The encounter with DNA and finding a father, the ill-conceived marriage and the next generation of Guinness girls, the ongoing struggle with the family’s curses aren’t neatly resolved in a happily ever after. This tale full of sound and fury doesn’t signify nothing but it doesn’t deliver epiphanies either. Ivana Lowell’s life is what it is, spangled in glitter, weighted with regrets, some truth uncovered, a few more lies waiting in the wings to bring the curtain down.

 Why Not Say What Happened?: A Memoir (Vintage)   Ivana Lowell | Alfred A. Knopf 2010

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