The House at Pooh Corner – A. A. Milne

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Pooh deserved his sequel. Which read very much like the first book–undoubtedly a Good Thing. In the series of thrilling adventures that comprise The House at Pooh Corner, Pooh and his friends in the Hundred Acre Wood deal with issues of home and homelessness–and being home in time for elevenses. That would be a small smackerel of honey if you are a bear. So, lost and found in the Forest–found first: a Tigger. The Tigger was a Very Bouncy Thing and that caused a few problems but with Rabbit’s Brain and Kanga’s Strengthening Medicine (it was Roo’s actually but Roo did everything he could not to take it) the Tigger was more or less managed.

Piglet is extremely Brave and very Selfless several times in this book and Pooh makes up some memorable poems to hum. Pooh is a Zen bard with flawless intuition and not nearly the Brain of Rabbit. But no matter. Pooh and Piglet build Eeyore a house in Pooh Corner, which is just in time as the pile of sticks that was Eeyore’s house has suddenly disappeared. And Owl’s house is crushed when the tree it is in is blown over in a big wind. And then Piglet…because of Eeyore…but Pooh…well, best to read all about it.

Things are up with Christopher Robin in this book. He is learning A and Factors and Brazil. And British boys of a certain class get sent off to boarding school at a tender age–or at least they did when Christopher Robin was a small boy.  Which means he might never get to do Nothing any more–very sad. So Winnie-the-Pooh was an Introduction and The House at Pooh Corner is the opposite of that, which Owl says is a Contradiction, and which A. A. Milne says is a Goodbye, but not really.  

“Pooh, promise you won’t forget about me, ever. Not even when I’m a hundred.”

Pooh thought for a little.

“How old shall I be then?” 

“Ninety-nine.”

Pooh nodded.

“I promise,” he said.

And, having just been made Sir Pooh de Bear, a faithful Knight, we can be sure he kept his promise.

The House at Pooh Corner (Pooh Original Edition)   A. A. Milne | E. P. Dutton   1928

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